Articles Posted in Head Injuries

LighningStorm

Falling trees or tree limbs have sadly resulted in severe debilitating injuries and even death.  An injured party has the right to seek compensation for their damages, pain and suffering, wage loss, future wage loss, necessary and reasonable medical expenses, anticipated future expenses, mental anguish and past or future impairment of ability to enjoy life.  Compensation can be collected from the responsible party.  However, from time to time, the party we believe to be responsible for the claim may deny liability of the damages caused by the falling-tree stating the fallen tree was an ‘Act of God.’

The definition of an Act of God varies. Court rulings clarify the legal use of this argument.  For the most part, an Act of God defense must demonstrate that the circumstance was so abnormal and unusual in nature that no human assistance or human influence would have changed the event.  An Act of God defense must demonstrate that the falling tree could not have been prevented by ordinary human foresight.

zip lining risks
A bright blue sky, a beautiful mountain or body of water – as Spring Break 2015 descends upon us, thoughts turn to an outdoor fun – such as zip lining – which is a fun outdoor activity that while mostly safe, has inherent dangers as well.

What is Zip Lining?

trampolineBackyard trampolines are very common here in Sacramento due to our year-round mild weather; and bouncing has been a great way for kids to burn off their excess energy for generations, however trampolines can be quite dangerous.  Dangers include falling from the trampoline, or landing incorrectly within it, which can result in significant head, neck or back injuries.  Every year, almost 100,000 emergency room visits are attributed to injuries sustained while using trampolines.  Most of those injuries – upwards of 80% – occur in children under 15 years of age.

The risk of backyard trampolines has been deemed great enough that the American Academy of Pediatrics has advised that trampolines should be used only within supervised programs with trained personnel – for example, within a gymnastics class – and not in private homes or unsupervised play areas.  Despite the warning, sales of backyard trampolines have risen to approximately million sold per year.

A Recent article   on Fox hi-lited a San Diego accident where a father was pushing a baby carriage across an intersection while walking with the mother, when he and the baby were struck

by an SUV and both suffered serious head injuries.

People who have sustained catastrophic injuries (and their families) are often in need of very specific, specialized information regarding the injury suffered, the latest care and support options, research into new treatment options, and the psychological and emotional support that can come from connecting with other people who have suffered similar losses.  For some of the categories of catastrophic injuries, the following resources may be helpful:

resources for catastrophic injuriesBurn Injury Resources

airbags are most likely to cause injuries toAirbags have probably been the most significant car safety device to be developed since the invention of seat belts, however even though they can provide significant protection against major injury, they can also cause injuries both when they work as intended and when they don’t. Airbags first began appearing in passenger vehicles in the 1970s, with driver airbags becoming common by the early 1990s, and with vehicles of today now often including both driver and front passenger airbags to protect against impacts from the front and side torso and side curtain airbags to protect against collisions from the sides and rollovers.

In order to protect a vehicle occupant from serious injury in a collision, an airbag must react with an equivalent significant force — it does this by exploding a pyrotechnic device that rapidly and forcefully fills the bag with gas. Some systems are smart enough to detect the severity of an impact and “explode” the airbag with just enough force to provide protection, but most systems — especially older ones — simply inflate the bag to its fullest. And in the United States, design standards require a more forceful bag inflation than do international standards.

Just as every catastrophic injury is unique and every victim is unique, so are the teams of medical and legal experts needed to handle the catastrophic injury victim’s care and their personal injury claim.

catastrophic injury treatmentExperts Utilized in Catastrophic Injury Cases — Severe Burn Injuries

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-images-woman-smelling-apple-image38289999
This is part 2 of a 2 part series on Diagnosing loss of smell. Part 1 of the article is here.

After the patient sees the ENT doctor and neurologist, the neurologist will usually order an Olfactory  Nerve Evoked Potentials test to help confirm the patients loss of smell.

http://www.dreamstime.com/royalty-free-stock-images-woman-smelling-apple-image38289999
Diagnosing Loss of Smell from Trauma  is a complicated process.

Many times, people in motor vehicle accidents suffer head or brain injuries as a result. Ten percent of people suffering head or brain injuries will also develop a diminished or lost sense of smell.

From news articles to television programs to events in our own lives, we are exposed to a blizzard of terms relating to head injuries. Sometimes they’re used correctly, sometimes they’re not, and in either case they can be confusing.

brain injuriesTraumatic Brain Injuries