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Citrus Heights Traffic Stop Did Not Cause Death

I’m Ed Smith, a Citrus Heights Car Accident Lawyer. I proudly help families who have lost a loved one due to another’s negligence. Wrongful death lawsuits help plaintiffs find financial help during times of crisis, which can help the family cover funeral expenses, medical bills, and lost wages. Wrongful death lawsuits are an important part of our justice system in California.

A recent collision on Business 80 in Sacramento was only the latest in a rash of California highway wrong-way driver crashes — some of them deadly — that have occurred in recent months. Fortunately, this incident only resulted in “moderate” injuries to the wrong-way driver himself. The driver of the big rig that he hit was not injured. Unfortunately, this was not the case in a wrong-way crash in Long Beach that killed one driver and critically injured two other people.  Nor was it the case in a May collision on Interstate 80 in Sacramento that killed three people, a May crash on Highway 50 in Sacramento that killed four, or a January collision on Interstate 80 in Sacramento that killed three people.

A common factor in many wrong-way crashes is alcohol use.  The drivers in these incidents are frequently confused by highway on-ramps and off-ramps, entering against traffic on the off-ramps.  They are then frequently found to be driving against traffic in the left-hand fast lanes, thinking instead that they are “safely” driving in the correct direction in the right-hand slow lanes.  These accidents are most common at night, and the sudden appearance of the wrong-way driver in front of the right-way drivers — with combined closing speeds well over 100 mph — leaves other drivers with very, very little time to react.  The high combined closing speed also adds to the severity of the impacts that result.

speed hump
Speed tables, speed bumps and speed humps are similar structures in concept and they all come with a purpose of lowering vehicle speeds in order to promote safer driving.  However, they differ in length and height of the raised area that makes up the obstacle.  A speed bump is designed to be used in lower speed areas such as private and residential roads as well as parking lots.  The speed bump is rounded and varies from two to six inches in height.  It is generally one to three feet in length from the front of the bump to the back.  The width of a speed bump can vary as well – anywhere from one to ten feet.  A speed bump’s design is such that it allows comfortable passage at very low speeds of around five mph.

While “speed bump” is probably the most widely used term, you may have noticed signs warning of an upcoming “speed hump” or “speed table”.  Speed humps usually will not be greater than four inches in height and generally are 10-12 feet long.  The speed hump serves a different purpose than the speed bump and allows the entire vehicle to sit on the obstacle before descending onto the other side of the roadway.  Speed humps do not carry the same risk of a vehicle bottoming out, and allow for greater speeds than speed bumps.  They are often used in residential areas with speed limits of 25 mph or less.  They are employed to promote safety of streets on which people live, and to improve the traffic flow of residential areas, thereby improving the environmental quality as well.