Articles Posted in Parking Lot Accident

1412510096v0fayWith nearly everyone carrying smart phones these days, it is usually quite convenient to get good quality accident scene photos.  Remembering to snap key photos at the scene can be very helpful to any sort of damage claim that arises from the accident.  There are certain things that are helpful to document after an automobile accident:

  • An overview of the accident scene from several vantage points;
  • All property damage – detailed photos of the damage to all involved vehicles and any other objects such as a destroyed fence;

If you are struck and injured by a vehicle that jumped a curb while walking or standing on a sidewalk you certainly have an injury case against the driver and owner of the vehicle.

What if you are hit and hurt while using an ATM machine along a sidewalk, or standing at an outdoor takeout window, or in line waiting to enter a restaurant?

Of course you still have a personal injury case against the vehicle, but also keep in mind you may have a case against the business who put the ATM machine too close to the road, or the restaurant that placed a takeout window unsafely close to passing cars or forced a line of patrons outside too close to traffic.

speed hump
Speed tables, speed bumps and speed humps are similar structures in concept and they all come with a purpose of lowering vehicle speeds in order to promote safer driving.  However, they differ in length and height of the raised area that makes up the obstacle.  A speed bump is designed to be used in lower speed areas such as private and residential roads as well as parking lots.  The speed bump is rounded and varies from two to six inches in height.  It is generally one to three feet in length from the front of the bump to the back.  The width of a speed bump can vary as well – anywhere from one to ten feet.  A speed bump’s design is such that it allows comfortable passage at very low speeds of around five mph.

While “speed bump” is probably the most widely used term, you may have noticed signs warning of an upcoming “speed hump” or “speed table”.  Speed humps usually will not be greater than four inches in height and generally are 10-12 feet long.  The speed hump serves a different purpose than the speed bump and allows the entire vehicle to sit on the obstacle before descending onto the other side of the roadway.  Speed humps do not carry the same risk of a vehicle bottoming out, and allow for greater speeds than speed bumps.  They are often used in residential areas with speed limits of 25 mph or less.  They are employed to promote safety of streets on which people live, and to improve the traffic flow of residential areas, thereby improving the environmental quality as well.

Speed tables are roughly the same height (3-4 inches) but, as the name would imply, longer in length than speed humps. Speed tables generally have a relatively long flat top and up and down ramps that have a more subtle slope than humps, giving them the ability to accommodate automobiles traveling at higher speeds of up to 30 mph.

A pedestrian is injured every 8 minutes in the United States.  As a Sacramento Pedestrian Accident attorney for many years, I have handled hundreds of pedestrian injury cases.

In every case, a quick investigation of the scene is necessary. The accident scene may have tire tracks that show the vehicle’s direction of travel, skid marks as well as debris that can show the point of impact. There may be parts of the car still present such as broken headlights or mirrors and these should be collected. Road markings should be measured and photographed.

The direction the pedestrian traveled should also be photographed  and measured. Any blood on the pavement should be photographed and measured.

One in Ten accidents occur in Parking lots or parking garages according to a recent study by Nationwide insurance. Men are more likely to get in an accident with another car than are women (37% vs

33%), strike a parking cart (12 percent vs 5 percent) or hit a pedestrian ( 8 percent vs 1 percent).

Additionally, more men than women get in road rage incidents in lots (27 percent vs 20 percent), and more get into physical altercations ( 8 percent vs 2 percent).