Articles Posted in Eye Trauma

Lacrimal System Trauma to the Eye

Iris Trauma

Lacrimal System Trauma to the Eye

I’m Ed Smith, a Sacramento Eye Injury Lawyer. Lacrimal system trauma to the eye frequently occur along with eyelid and facial trauma.  Canalicular lacerations in particular may be subtle and therefore must be suspected so that a careful repair can be carried out.  Injuries to the lacrimal system can occur with blunt or sharp lacerations. Falls, car accidents, and blows with blunt objects may cause shearing forces or tearing forces to the lid, causing an avulsion of the medial canthus.  The lid tends to tear at its weakest point, which is at the attachment of the medial canthal tendon to the tarsus, lying hear the inner corner of the eye (the punctum).  Occasionally, the tear can be medial to that and can lacerate the tear duct, which is more difficult to identify and to repair.

Traumatic Hyphema

Traumatic Hyphema

Traumatic Hyphema

I’m Ed Smith, a Roseville personal injury lawyer. Blunt trauma to the eye often results in bleeding into the anterior chamber, which is called a traumatic hyphema.  Although the blood usually clears out from the anterior chamber, there can be complications of this condition.  Because these complications can threaten the vision, it is important to follow hyphema patients very carefully.

I’m Ed Smith, a Sacramento Eye Accident Lawyer. Any time there is a penetrating wound to the cornea, the iris is often injured as it is directly beneath the cornea in the eye.  The injury can be a direct laceration to the cornea or the iris can prolapse through a laceration in the cornea.  Blunt trauma can also impact the iris.  The most common injuries to the iris include tears in the sphincter and dialysis of the root of the iris.  You can also get iridoschisis and atrophy of the iris.  Most iris injuries also result in a traumatic hyphema.

Iris injuries are important because, when they are injured, they result in a distorted, nonreactive pupil and photophobia because the iris doesn’t close down when exposed to light.  If the pupil is contracted permanently, there can be a loss of full vision.  The idea behind treating an iris injury is to preserve as much of the tissue of the iris as possible and to restore its normal architecture.

Penetrating Injury

Penetrated Eyelid Trauma

Penetrated Eyelid Trauma

Penetrated Eyelid Trauma

I’m Ed Smith, a Sacramento Eye Injury Lawyer. Management of the patient with penetrating eyelid trauma is facilitated by knowing the mechanisms of wound healing.  Healing of full thickness eyelid injuries has not been extensively studied but clinical observations suggest that the fundamental series of events is probably similar to other types of wounds.  Cutaneous wound repair might be primary or secondary.

Traumatic Endophthalmitis

Traumatic Endophthalmitis

Traumatic Endophthalmitis

I’m Ed Smith, a Sacramento Eye Injury Attorney. Despite recent advances in the treatment of endophthalmitis, infection from penetrating eye trauma continues to present a clinical challenge.  It remains an important cause of vision failure following open globe injuries and may complicate seemingly benign injuries such as small, self-sealing corneal lacerations without associated intraocular damage.  About 62 percent of all cases of endophthalmitis occur after eye surgery, ten percent are associated with planned or inadvertent filtering blebs and the rest are due to metastatic spread from other infected areas.

Although the prognosis has been significantly improved by recent refinements in diagnoses, antibiotic therapy, and vitreous surgery, the overall prognosis of traumatic endophthalmitis remains poor compared to that seen in intraocular surgery.  The reasons for the poor prognosis include associated damage to vital eye structures, infection with extremely virulent organisms, and delay in diagnosis and treatment of the condition. Continue reading ›

Eye Trauma

While the eyes are relatively protected by the bones of the face and the placement of the nose, eye injuries can still happen following a motor vehicle accident, altercation, sports injury or industrial injury.

Injury can happen to the bones around the eye itself, to the orbit (the actual eye), or both. Damage to the eye can result in double vision or loss of vision even if the correct treatment is given. In some cases, eye injuries can be prevented (such as in industrial conditions), while other times, such as in motor vehicle accidents or falls, injury to the eye is unavoidable and must be treated.