Articles Tagged with pediatric injury

Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injuries

Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injuries

I’m Ed Smith, a Sacramento Traumatic Brain Injury Lawyer. Pediatric Traumatic Brain Injuries can be devastating. Science is just now beginning to learn about the short- and long-term effects of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) to adults. The effects of traumatic brain injuries on children is also being investigated and studied but are, as of present, not fully understood. Making matters worse, some of the symptoms and effects of a TBI suffered in childhood may not fully manifest until later in life. What do parents need to know about childhood TBIs and the effects this may have on their child’s development?

Incidence of TBIs Among Children

According to the Brain Injury Association of America, TBIs are the primary cause of childhood disability and death. According to statistics maintained by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention:

  • Approximately 62,000 children between the ages of 0 and 19 require hospitalization each year for TBIs;
  • Over 500,000 children between the ages of 0 and 19 are seen in emergency rooms for TBIs each year and released without hospitalization; and
  • Childhood TBIs can be inflicted as the result of car crashes, injuries while playing sports, and falls from heights;

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Injuries are common in children and are one of the leading causes of death for kids age 0-18. They can, however, be prevented by understanding what injuries are more common in the different age groups. It may take instruction of healthcare providers, parents, and the children themselves to prevent these injuries from occurring. In addition to the family’s financial burden, childhood injuries lead to emotional trauma for parents, society and the child himself.

In one study, a look at the morbidity and mortality of injuries in childhood was used to determine intervention strategies for kids at different developmental levels. They used data from 1996-1998 at a California hospital and by means of death certificate to determine the external cause of injury for children less than 4 years of age. Rates of death and injury were calculated at three month intervals.

Approximately 300,000 injuries involving doors need treatment at an emergency room each year in the U.S. Most of the victims are children of preschool age and under, and most injuries from doors result in some kind of amputation. These door-related injuries are completely preventable and there are some inexpensive devices that could be put on doors to prevent these amputation injuries. There are door closing devices that prevent a door from slamming and prevent injuries from the open side of the door. Most serious injuries, however, result from the door’s the hinge side, where the closing pressure from the door can exceed 80,000 pounds per square inch.

Some companies have created hinge protectors that eliminate the possibility of hinge accidents. A casing made of plastic is placed around the sides of the door that blocks contact with the hinge face. There are door stoppers that can also help prevent unexpected door closures. You can also paint or tape near the hinge and door knob side of the door to remind kids to stay away from that part of the wall.