Articles Posted in concussion injury

Elk Grove Personal Injury Lawyer Discusses NFL Player Brain Injuries

 
Over the years, the NFL has undergone extreme criticism for its failure to take care of players after retirement that suffer from permanent disability or long-term medical effects related to injuries sustained while playing football. Back in 1994, the NFL Commissioner founded the Mild Traumatic Brain Injury (MTBI) Committee that was focused on determining whether any long-term health effects arose from concussions sustained during football games. A doctor with no background in neurology or neuropsychology with no experience with head trauma was appointed lead of the MTBI Committee. The Committee began conducting surveys and studies and releasing findings. In sum, since the Committee was created, the results of the studies have largely concluded that football concussions were not affiliated with long-term effects.

However, independent medical research programs also looked into the evidence and found that concussions, especially repeated head trauma, were the cause of the overwhelming number of retired players’ brain injuries. These studies found that football players who sustained concussions while on the field suffered from a variety of brain injuries and other brain-related medical conditions later on in life, including:

Traumatic brain injury can certainly cause devastating results, however sometimes inspiration results as well, as shown in these videos.

National champion cross-country skier recovers from massive head injuries and seven-week coma following a motor vehicle collision:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=s4C1oOEMxTM

cranioConcussions and closed head injuries, also known as traumatic brain injuries, are common injuries following an auto or motorcycle accident.  I have represented many clients over the years with these types of injuries and they can have a substantial effect on one’s life and cognitive abilities.

Classic concussion is defined as a brief and reversible coma occurring at the time of a trauma to the head. This type of concussion is always accompanied by some degree of retrograde and post-traumatic amnesia (anterograde amnesia). Neurological changes, such as slowed heart rate (bradycardia), dilated pupils, and sometimes even brief seizure-like episodes, are also associated with it. By definition, classic concussion always implies a transient loss of, or very signifi­ cant alteration of, consciousness and awareness.

What Is Postconcussion Syndrome?