Hip Fracture Physical Therapy

Physical Therapy for Hip Fracture 

Once someone has been diagnosed with a hip fracture, they will probably be placed in a cast for several weeks. The cast will immobilize the hip joint, giving it time to heal. During this time, the muscles of the hip will not be used. As a result, the joint is going to feel stiff once the cast comes off. The muscles will have atrophied and people are going to feel weak. Therefore, hip fracture physical therapy will play a major role in completing the recovery process.

With the help of a trained physical therapist, individuals will have their strength, mobility, and flexibility restored to their hip joint. Although the process may take several weeks to months, most individuals will make a full recovery with the help of an experienced physical therapist. There are several exercises that the therapist may ask someone to perform as part of this recovery program.

The Hip Bridge

Perhaps the first and easiest exercise that someone will perform as part of their hip physical therapy is the hip bridge. In this exercise, the individual will lay on their back with their knees bent. Their arms will be resting at their side. Then, the individual will lift their hips off the floor until the hips are in line with the knees and shoulders. This pose will be held for a few seconds before the hips are slowly lowered back towards the ground. This exercise is done to increase hip flexibility and will gradually bring strength back to the muscles of the hips and lower back.

The Hip Stretch

As the flexibility of the hip gradually increases, people will move from their back to their stomach. In this hip stretch, the individual takes a kneeling position. Then, keeping their feet and knees in place, the individual gradually reaches forward as far as they can. This stretches the muscles of the hips, restoring flexibility. As their flexibility improves, people can also reach from side to side to focus on a single hip. Flexibility is important for preventing discomfort and also for preventing future hip fractures.

The Modified Plank

Once someone feels more confident in their hip area, they can move to the modified plank and start to focus on building strength. The modified plank is done to isolate the recovering hip for a more intense exercise. The exercise is started on the side. Then, using one arm and one foot, slowly raise the body off the ground. There should be a straight line from the shoulder to the foot. Then, the other leg is gradually lifted off the support leg, then slowly placed back in its original position. This is a strenuous exercise that can help build strength in the hip joint. The goal is to build strength and prevent breaking the hip in the future.

Hip Fracture Physical Therapy: Squats

As the hip gets stronger, the individual can add weight to their hip by doing squats. Squats are done to not only strengthen the hip but also the surrounding muscles such as the hamstrings and quads. When doing squats, it is important to keep the lower back in line with the pelvis to prevent back pain. Squats can be made more challenging by adding weights either in the form of free weights or medicine balls. Done properly, squats can strengthen the hip joints and reduce the chances of suffering another broken hip.

Sacramento Hip Fracture Lawyer

I’m Ed Smith, a Sacramento Hip Fracture Lawyer. Hip fracture physical therapy is a key part of completing the recovery process. If you or someone you know for has been diagnosed with a hip fracture following a traumatic accident due to the negligence of another person or entity, feel free to call me at (916) 921-6400 or (800) 404-5400. I’m here to provide free, friendly advice.

I am proud to be an attorney of the Million Dollar Advocates Forum as well as the Top One Percent – Association of Distinguished Counsel.

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